IASTE 2014: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

WHOSE TRADITION?

DECEMBER 14-17, 2014

14th Conference of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Environments

IASTE 2014 conference program (PDF)
IASTE 2014 conference program
IASTE 2014 conference photos
IASTE 2014 call for abstracts poster
IASTE 2014 conference poster
IASTE 2014 Working Paper Series


Past IASTE conferences have called on scholars to consider tradition’s relationship to development, utopia, and most recently, myth. In response, scholars have advanced multiple perspectives regarding the construction of traditions in space and place. These discussions necessarily involve the dimension of time. Utopia implies the construction of a future ideal, whether religious or philosophical, while myth attempts to discover the origins of history, whether in the imagination or in reality. While myth usually invokes an invented past and utopia imagines an alternative future, the dimension of time is paramount. Thus, traditions are revealed never to be the static legacy of the past, but rather a project for its dynamic reinterpretation in the service of the present and the future. To understand how traditions are tied to notions of time and space, it is thus important to consider their subjectivity, authorship, and power. Behind the construction or deconstruction of any tradition also lies the subject, whose interests in the present are often hidden. To reveal this process of agency, one may ask: tradition, by whom?

In examining themes of authorship and subjectivity, this conference will seek to uncover in what manner, for what reason, by whom, to what effect, and during what intervals traditions have been deployed with regard to the built environment. Our current period of globalization has led to the flexible reinterpretation of traditions via the mass media for reasons of power and profit. A proliferation of environments, for example, adopt traditional forms of one place and period in a completely different contextual setting, while new design traditions may privilege image over experience. At the same time, the advent of new mobile technologies with the power to compress and distort traditional configurations of space and time has allowed for the flourishing of new, empowering practices. Such practices have led to new traditions of urban resistance and uprisings that travel fluidly between such diverse locales as Sao Paolo and Istanbul, Madrid and Cairo, and give voice to certain populations previously excluded. Questions of power, the other, and changing configurations of time and space will open up discussions of the ways in which traditional practices shape the histories and futures of built environments.

As in past IASTE conferences, scholars and practitioners from architecture, architectural history, art history, anthropology, archeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, urban studies, and related disciplines are invited to submit papers that address one of the following tracks:

Track I. WHO: Power and the Construction of Traditions

Questioning ownership and authority of dominant traditions deployed in the making of space is an essential first step. The historical development of any tradition displays patterns of selection that either negate or celebrate certain forms and practices. Which narratives become privileged in spatial practices and to what end? What are the politics of ‘choosing’ traditions, manufacturing or creating them? Further, what is omitted, negated, or silenced in the interest of those in power at any moment? Thus, to understand the transmission of traditions between generations, it is essential to examine linkages between tradition, authority, and power. Papers in this track should address traditions that are ‘produced’ and transmitted or deployed across time and place. Papers should consider spaces and practices that have been created, adopted, or invoked by certain social groups and/or governments for specific purposes.

Track II. WHAT: Place and the Anchoring of Traditions

In order to examine how traditions are manifest in space and time, it is important to consider which versions, particularities, or specificities of tradition emerge and are subsequently anchored in specific places. Understanding where traditions are established in built form and practice is equally as important as understanding whose traditions are privileged. For example, Southeast Asia and other parts of the world are witnessing a revival of urban agriculture which will no doubt influence the future urban form of our cities. How can new settlements incorporate the demands of food security and urban agriculture within their complex infrastructure and eco-systems? In Track II, papers should actively explore hegemonic spatial practices and their alternatives that either adopt or challenge and contest standard configurations of power and authority. For example, how have disadvantaged groups left out of dominant spatial traditions created their own traditions? How are such these spatial practices transmitted? And how do they subvert established norms, allowing new voices to enter and gain legitimacy? Papers in this track should explore how traditions are anchored in place.

Track III. WHERE: Mobility and the Reimagination of Traditions

In a rapidly changing postglobal world, traditions cease to be fixed or attached to given places for very long. The mobile nature of contemporary traditions can negate past forms of ownership and authorship that assumed a top-down power structure that privileged an elite. The celebrations and ways of one culture may be popularized through adoption by others. In many cases, this results in commodification and a loss of original referents. In others, a tradition common to neighboring geographies and communities may be strategically claimed by a distinct subaltern or minority group for political purposes. Technologies of reproducibility, such as photography, radio, film, TV, and advertising, have undermined the placed-based nature of traditions, allowing flexible interpretations as well as the creation of new meanings. In fact, the mass media have created their own traditions. The advent of the internet and wireless media has further facilitated new interpretations of traditions, with flexible temporalities and places. Papers in this track should consider the emergence and establishment of new mobile traditions and their possibility for both disruption and foreclosure.

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Nezar AlSayyad, IASTE President, University of California, Berkeley
Rahinah Ibrahim, Local Conference Director, University of Putra Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
Mark Gillem, IASTE Director and Conference Chair, University of Oregon, Eugene
Jennifer Gaugler, IASTE Conference Coordinator, University of California, Berkeley
Tomi Laine Clark, IASTE Administrative Coordinator, University of California, Berkeley
Susanty Nazmi, Local Conference Coordinator and Administrator, University of Putra Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur
Barry Gordon, IASTE Conference Associate, University of Oregon, Eugene

SESSIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Hesham Khairy Issa, Gamal Abdelmonem, Khaled Adham, Heba Farouk Ahmed, Howayda Al-Harithy, Joe Aranha, Gabriel Arboleda, Vandana Baweja, Anne-Marie Broudehoux, Susanne Cowan, Cecilia Chu, Howard Davis, Tammy Gaber, Sophie Gonick, Clara Irazabal, Chee-Kien Lai, Morna Livingston, Laurence Keith Loftin III, Duanfang Lu, Robert Mugerauer, Mrinalini Rajagopalan, Mike Robinson, Shawhin Roudbari, Gunawan Tjahjono, Ipek Tureli, Montira Horayangura Unakul, Dell Upton, Jieheerah Yun

LOCAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Norsidah Ujang, Marek Kozlowski, Kamariah Dola, Nor Atiah Ismail, Faziawati Abdul Aziz, Nangkula Utaberta, Susanty Nazmi

CONFERENCE HOST
Universiti Putra Malaysia

Conference Supporters
Faculty of Design and Architecture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Ministry of Education Malaysia, Malaysian Tourism Promotion Board

REGISTRATION INFORMATION
We urge you to register as soon as possible. To keep no-shows to a minimum and to guarantee the comprehensiveness of each session, we will not include speakers who fail to register by June 15. Registration fees are $425 (which includes an annual IASTE membership) and $225 for current students (with proof of student status). Non-presenting spouses and partners of conference presenters qualify for the lower rate. These fees include entrance to all conference sessions and plenary sessions, the registration packet with conference preliminaries and program, and all conference receptions.
Online registration is available here.

CONFERENCE FEES AND DEADLINES
Submission of Abstracts: February 17, 2014
Abstract acceptance: April 15, 2014
Early registration: June 15, 2014
Paper submission: August 1, 2014

General Registration (Early): $425
General Registration (Late): $525
Student Registration (Early): $225
Student Registration (Late): $300

Registration will open on April 15, 2014.

These fees include entrance to all conference sessions and plenary sessions, the registration packet with conference preliminaries and program, all conference receptions, and a local bus and walking tour of Kuala Lumpur. All conference presenters must register in order to participate in the conference and be included in the final program.

CONFERENCE HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
The PARKROYAL Hotel in Kuala Lumpur has been selected as the primary conference hotel. This five-star hotel is in City Center, a ten minute walk to the Petronas Towers. Complimentary wireless is available throughout the hotel. IASTE has negotiated a special price with the hotel for conference participants which is extremely affordable for a five star hotel. All presenters and attendees are encouraged to stay in the conference hotel, as IASTE pays a heavy tax if you stay elsewhere and we fall below the number of rooms booked by IASTE for the special value. In order to receive the special room rate, please book through the following link:
http://www.parkroyalhotels.com/en/hotels-resorts/malaysia/kuala-lumpur/stay/offers/iaste-conference.html

POST-CONFERENCE TOURS
Post-conference tours should be booked through the travel agencies before the end of September.

Malacca (December 18th, 2014: one day trip)
The historical city of Malacca is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Once one of the greatest trading ports in Southeast Asia, Malacca is now a popular destination for its unique glimpse into Malaysia’s multicultural heritage. Sites include the Cheng Hoon Teng Temple (Malaysia’s oldest traditional Chinese temple), the Portuguese ruins of Porta de Santiago, and the Stadhuys building, believed to be the oldest Dutch building in the East. This is a one day trip with travel by bus to and from Kuala Lumpur.

Travel agent (for Malacca trip only): Laras Travel & Tours SDN BHD
Link: http://larastravel.com/booking-packages/product/91-historical-malacca-full-day-tour-for-iaste-post-conference-2014/

Borneo (December 19th – December 21st, 2014: three day and two night trip)
On the morning of December 19th, participants will fly to Miri Sarawek and transfer to the Borneo Tropical Rainforest Resort. Participants will have the opportunity to hike on foot paths through the rainforest, visit the orchard farm, take an educational tour of the domestic animal farm, and enjoy the cuisine at the resort’s café or restaurant. Participants will start the second day with a scenic drive to the Niah National Park, where they will visit the Niah Museum and the Niah Caves. On the morning of the third day there will be a tour of Miri City, which has developed from a small village into a modern cosmopolitan city with a bustling farmer’s market, Old China Town, and other sites of interest. This is a three day and two night trip.

Travel agent (for Borneo trip only): Planet Borneo Tours & Travel Services
Link: http://www.planetborneotours.com/iaste-2014/
Booking instructions: To book this tour please follow the instructions on their site to fill out the pdf form and email it to reservation@planetborneotours.com. Please note that the only way to pay for this tour is through wire transfer. Bank information can be found at the bottom of the page.

VISA INFORMATION
Regardless of your country of origin, your passport must be valid for 6 months after your scheduled date of departure from Malaysia. Travelers from some countries do not need a visa or will be given a visa upon arrival, while travelers from other countries will need to obtain a visa before leaving their home country. Travelers from certain countries may also require special approval from the Ministry of Home Affairs, Malaysia. Travelers from some countries may require proof of yellow fever vaccination. For more information about visas, please visit the Immigration Department of Malaysia.

JEFFREY COOK AWARD FOR BEST PAPER
Every year, the Jeffrey Cook award is given to two presenters at the IASTE conference: the author of the best paper by a scholar and the author of the best paper by a student. The winners will each receive an award of $1,000 and, after appropriate review and revision, their papers will be published in Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review. Papers should be concerned with the subject of traditional dwellings and settlements in a manner that challenges traditional scholarship on the subject and engages spatial analysis from an interdisciplinary perspective. We strongly encourage all interested participants to indicate that they would like the Award Committee to evaluate their papers.


INQUIRIES

Please use the following information when making inquiries regarding the conference.

Mailing address:
IASTE 2014
Center for Environmental Design Research
390 Wurster Hall #1839
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-1839

Phone: 510.642.6801

Fax: 510.643.5571

E-mail: iaste@berkeley.edu

Website: iaste.berkeley.edu

IASTE 1992 Conference Description

DEVELOPMENT VS  T R A D I T I O N

The Cultural Ecology of Dwellings and Settlements

Conference Description

The fast-paced social transformations experienced by contemporary societies have radically challenged the cultural integrity and cohesion of their built environments. The massive and on-going effects of modernization on the ecosystems, cultural identities and traditional settlements are increasingly urging scholars and practitioners to investigate the dynamics of societal change. In the context of this urgency, the International Association for  the Study of Traditional Environments’ (IASTE’s) Third Conference will focus on the dialectic tension and potential balance between development and tradition in the built environments.

Continuing on the earlier practice of bringing together specialists from different disciplines, cultures, and regions, IASTE invites scholars in the fields of architecture, art history, anthropology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, urban studies, and other related disciplines to propose papers or panels which address the general theme of the conference in the following session topics

  • Traditional habitat: ecological adaptation and symbolic meaning.
  • Regionalism, cultural plurality, evolving social values, and the changing forms of vernacular dwellings and settlements
  • Segregation or integration of ethnic diversity and gender in traditional environments
  • External vs internal representations of traditional environments: myths, rituals and perceptions.
  • Rethinking progress: compatibility and tension between economic development and cultural preservation
  • Tourism, commodification of culture, and the dynamics of change in traditional settlements and vernacular landscapes
  • Tourism, preservation and museology: The restoration or reconstruction of historical and archeological environments as a stimulus for change
  • Traditionalism, nationalism, and the creation of the image.
  • Cultural dilemmas: Transformation vs conservation of colonial urban form
  • Post-colonialism and the Post-modern condition: the impact of globalization on traditional environments

Pre-registration Information

Interested colleagues are invited to submit a short 500-word (one page/single-spaced) abstract. Authors should also specify the session topic for their paper. Proposals for complete panels, workshops, poster sessions, and exhibits are also welcomed. Submitted material should be accompanies by a brief curriculum vitae of the contributor. Authors with accepted abstracts will be asked to prepare a full length paper (20-25 pages, double-spaced) including diagrams, photographs and drawings. Following a blind peer-review process, papers may be accepted for publication and/or presentation only. Contributors are also encouraged to submit copies of books and other published work for exhibition. Please send all material by Air Mail. All submissions must be in English, which is the language of the conference. However, French may be used for the oral presentation of papers at the conference, subject to the availability of simultaneous translation.

Please send all enquiries to:

IASTE 2000

Center for Environmental Design Research

390 Wurster Hall

University of California

Berkeley, CA 94720-1839, USA

Phone:  510.642.6801/510.642.2896

Fax: 510.643.5571

E-mail:    iaste@uclink4.berkeley.edu

Organizing Committee

Nezar AlSayyad, Conference C0-Director, University of California, Berkeley

Jean-Paul Bourdier, Conference Co-Director, University of California, Berkeley

Anne Hublin, Conference Chair, Ecole D’Architecture, Paris, France

Karen Bowie, Conference Co-Chair, Ecole D’Architecture, Paris, France

Bernard Haumont & Daniele Valabregue, Ministere de l’Equipement, du Logement, des Transports et de l’Espace, Paris, France

Nora Watanabe, Conference Administrator, University of California, Berkeley

Conference Sponsors

  • Ministere de l’Equipement, du Logement, des Transports et de l’Espace
  • Ecole d’Architecture Paris-Villemin
  • Center for Environmental Design Research, University of California, Berkeley

IASTE 1994 Conference Description

Value in Tradition
The Utility of Research on Identity and Sustainability

Conference Description
The world of traditional settlements has long demonstrated various patterns of sustainability and a balance between continuity and change. In contrast, the modern world is torn by paradoxes and conflicts born out of the drive for technological advancement, the demand for redistribution of scarce resources, and the need to construct identities in the face of inequitable relationships of power. Accordingly, the fourth conference of the International Association of the Study of Traditional Environments (IASTE) will focus on the dilemmas of building sustainable environments and analyzing community and ethnic identities in the nations of a global, post-colonial, post-Cold War world. The debate will be centered on whether traditional environments, seen not as the static legacy of the past but as a model for the critical reinterpretation of the present, can provide clues that will help us move beyond the present impasse.

IASTE is dedicated to understanding the wholeness and integrity of traditional environments and their adaptation and response to change. Once again it invites specialists from different cultures and regions in such disciplines as architecture, art history, anthropology, archeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, urban studies, and other related areas, to propose papers or panels which address the general theme of the utility of research on traditional environments, according to the following topics:

THE USES OF TRADITION IN BUILDING COMMUNITY AND NATIONAL IDENTITIES

  • Tradition and Identity in Post-Colonial Nation Building
  • Representation of the Notion of Tradition in Nation and Community Building
  • Persistence of Colonialism in Development Practices
  • Reuse and Reinterpretation of Foreign Traditions
  • Effects of Globalization on Traditional Settlements
  • Reenvisiting Traditional Identities in the Aftermath of Disasters

THE USES OF TRADITION IN BUILDING SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS

  • Technological Innovations in Traditional Forms
  • The Applicability of Traditional-Environment Research to Issues in Planning and Design.
  • Traditional Environments as Models for Building Alternatives to Contemporary Urban Problems
  • Tourism and its Impact on the Commodification and Demise of Sustainable Traditional Settlements

METHODS IN TRADITIONAL-ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH

  • Psychology of Perception and Representation in the Study of Traditional Environments
  • Changing Methodologies in the Field of Traditional-Environment Research
  • Tradition as Ideology in the Physical Environment
  • Tradition as the Critical Reinterpretation of the Past
  • Uses and Misuses: Tradition as a Value-Neutral Activity
  • The Uses of Tradition in Architectural Education

Conference Schedule
Deadline for receipt of abstracts and a C.V.- February 15, 1994
Notification of accepted abstracts for conference presentation– April 15, 1994
Deadline for receipt of completed papers – July 1, 1994
Notification of accepted papers for possible publication in the IASTE Working Papers Series: October 1, 1994
Deadline for receipt of revised papers November 1, 1994.
Conference Committee
Professor Nezar AlSayyad
, Conference Director, University of California, Berkeley
Professor Jean-Paul Bourdier, Conference Directors, University of California, Berkeley
Dr. Ali Bousnina, President, University of Tunis
Professor Mohamed El Bahi, Conference Director, ITAAUT
Professor Amor Khodja, ITAAUT

Sessions Committee
Dieter Ackerknecht, Nadia Alhasani, Saleh Al-Hathloul, Tarik Al-Soliman, William Bechhoefer, Hugh Burgess, Pierre Clement, Jefferey Cook, Mohamed El-Sioufi, Mui Ho, Carol Martin-Watts, Michael Kaplan, Heng Chye Kiang, Paul Oliver, Marcela Pizzi, Ahmad Reffat, Manuel Teixeira, Donald Watts.

Conference Sponsors
Center for Environmental Design Research, University of California, Berkeley
Institut Technologique d’Art, d’Architecture, et d’Urbanisme de Tunis (ITAAUT)
University of Tunis II, Ministere de l’Education et des Sciences
Ministere de l’Equipement et de l’Habitat. Tunis
Ministere de l’Environment et de l’Amenegement du Territoire
L’Association des Anciens de l’ITAAUT
Send all inquiries to:
IASTE ’94 Conference
Center for Environmental Design Research
University of California, Berkeley
390 Wurster Hall, #1839
Berkeley, CA 94720-1839
Tel: 510.642.2896
Fax: 510.643.5571
 

IASTE 1996 Conference Description

IDENTITY, TRADITION AND BUILT FORM
THE ROLE OF CULTURE IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Conference Description
As the twenty-first century approaches, traditional settlements in both developed and developing countries are facing major challenges created by both local and global pressures. Massive urbanization and suburbanization, the spread of consumerism, of transnationalization of capital, the internationalization of labor, and the growth of expatriate migrant populations and ethnic minorities are among the processes that have irrevocably changed the forms of traditional settlements.

Globalization trends and increased communication have additionally created, in the latter part of this century, a world system which is ripe with cultural conflict. Some argue that the world is becoming a singular economic entity characterized by its informationally interconnected modes of production and exchange under a predominantly capitalist order. Within this paradigm, tradition loses its relevance as culture becomes more informationally based and less place rooted. Yet there are those who argue that culture can never be placeless, and that development scenarios must always be based on recognizing the placeness of culture and the regional value of tradition.

As a means of maintaining their identity, many nations and communities have resorted to their traditions, religion, and ethnic roots as primary ways of identifying their collective selves. Other nations, becoming more inclusive of the “other,” have accepted a redefinition of their identity by embracing hybridity and recognizing the multicultural dimensions of their constituent groups.

IASTE has always been dedicated to studying traditional dwellings and settlements as a means of exploring the conflicts brought about by the necessity of adaptation and change. Once again, it invites specialists from different nations in such disciplines as architecture, art history,  anthropology, archaeology, folklore, geography, history, planning, sociology, urban studies, and related areas to propose papers and panels which address the following themes:

  • Tradition as a means of maintaining identity in the face of change and the effects of the rise of nationalism, ethnicity, and religion on the built environment.
  • Multiculturalism and hybridity as new paradigms for the invention of tradition and embracing the culture of the “other” and the effects  of such practices on the built environment.
  • Tradition in the age of globalization and communication, and the impact of placeless culture on the built environment.
  • The role of culture in the development of communities of communications and the uses of tradition in the creation and improvement of the built environment.
  • Elements of the traditional built environment and the representations of identity

Conference Schedule
Deadline for receipt of abstracts and a C.V.- February 15, 1996
Notification of accepted abstracts for conference presentationApril 15, 1996
Deadline for receipt of completed papers for possible publication in the IASTE Working Papers Series- July 1, 1996
Deadline for receipt of revised papers November 1, 1996.

Conference Directors
Professor Nezar AlSayyad, University of California, Berkeley
Professor Jean-Paul Bourdier, University of California, Berkeley

Conference Sponsors
Center for Environmental Design Research, University of California, Berkeley
Institutes for International and Area Studies, University of California, Berkeley
Institute for Urban and Regional Development, University of California, Berkeley
Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley

Conference Host
College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley

Send all inquiries to:
IASTE ’96
Center for Environmental Design Research
University of California, Berkeley
390 Wurster Hall, #1839
Berkeley, CA 94720-1839
Tel: 510.642.2896
Fax: 510.643.5571

IASTE 1998 Conference Description

MANUFACTURING HERITAGE, CONSUMING TRADITION
DEVELOPMENT, PRESERVATION AND TOURISM IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION

Conference Description
Amidst the monotony of global high capitalism, there is an increasing demand for built environments that promise unique cultural experiences. Many nations are resorting to heritage preservation, the invention of tradition, and the rewriting of history as forms of resistance against the homogenizing forces of modernity and globalization.  While this interest in local heritage may have been initiated during the era of colonialism, it was principally forged in the crucible of the independence struggles. In its early years, the nation-building enterprise generated a demand for historic monuments and symbolic buildings. Today, as these recently independent nations complete in an ever-tightening global economy, they find themselves needing to exploit their natural resources and vernacular built heritage to attract international investors. Tourism development has consequently intensified, producing entire communities that cater to almost wholly to, or are even inhabited year-round by, the “other.”

Understanding both heritage preservation and tourism development requires a contextual grounding in history and political economy. For example, studies of colonial urbanism have provided us with valuable insights into the politics of how heritages are defined and preserved. Similarly, the macro-economy of global production and investment provide a critical backdrop to the dynamics of tourism. This economy has generated consumers seeking “difference” and “hospitality” as economic goods,  as well as suppliers who make their living catering to this demand.

What does this mean for the study of the built environment? Although both the First and the Third Worlds may have equally strong desires to share in the culture of the “other, their approaches to conservation and development are not similarly motivated. The Third World, on one hand, attempts to emulate the “progress” of the First World and to adopt its developmental practices, but wishes to do so without the consequent destabilization of its local cultures. The First World, on the other hand, appears more interested in consuming the cultures and environments of Third World societies, and often advocates their preservation as part of a larger universal built heritage.

IASTE has always been dedicated to studying traditional dwellings and settlements as a means of exploring the conflicts brought about by the necessity of adaptation and change. Once again, it invites specialists from such disciplines as architecture, art history, anthropology, archaeology, folklore,  geography, history, planning, sociology, urban studies, and related areas to propose papers and panels which address the following themes:

MANUFACTURING HERITAGE

  • The role of the state and institutions of civil society in the politics and discourses of preservation and conservation
  • Invocations of vernacular tradition in the architecture of new tourism development and the uses of culture in the development of new communities
  • The preservation of the vernacular built environment and traditional lifestyles in the project of development
  • The rise of multiculturalism as a new paradigm in social practice and the resulting struggles over urban form
  • Invocations of ethnicity, nationalism, and religion as mechanisms of resistance against global commodification
  • Built environments as simulated representations of the historic and cultural Other
  • Transformations in traditional urban settings: Global forces and local trends

CONSUMING TRADITION

  • Sustainable tourism development and the possibilities of ecologically sensitive architecture
  • Globalization, the emergence of an information society, and the rise of placeless cultures
  • Invocations of tradition in the practice and pedagogy of architecture
  • Vernacular sets: The built environment as prop for staged events
  • Tourism development: Ideology and myth making
  • The appearance and realities of ecotourism
  • Changes in traditional rituals as a consequence of tourism

SUBMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Interested colleagues are invited to submit short, 500 word (one page, single-spaced) abstract accompanied by a one-page curriculum vitae. Authors should specify one of the above session topics for their paper. Proposals for complete panels and poster sessions are also welcome. All papers must be written and presented in English.

Following a blind peer-review process, papers may be accepted for presentation and/or publication. Contributors whose abstracts are accepted will be asked to prepare a full-length paper (20-25 pages, double-spaced including diagrams, photographs and drawings), and to pay conference registration fees in the amount of US $300 (hotel accommodations, travel, and optional excursions will not be covered by registration fees).
CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Deadline for receipt of abstracts and CV: February 15, 1998
Notification of accepted abstracts for conference presentation: April 15, 1998
Deadline for registration &  receipt of papers for possible publication in the IASTE Working Paper Series: Sept 15, 1998
Conference dates: December 15-19, 1998

Under the auspices of Dr Farouk Ismail, President, Cairo University, Honorary Conference Chair

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Nezar AlSayyad, Conference Director, University of California, Berkeley
Dalila El-Kerdany, Conference Local Co-Director, Cairo University, Egypt
Jean Paul Bourdier, Conference Co-Director, University of California, Berkeley
Ananya Roy, Conference Executive Coordinator, University of California, Berkeley
Nora Watanabe, Conference Administrator, University of California, Berkeley
Nassamat Abdel Kader, Conference Consultant, Cairo University, Egypt
Sayed Ettouney, Conference Consultant, Cairo University, Egypt
Basil Kamel, Conference Liaison, University of California, Berkeley/Cairo University, Egypt

LOCAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Hisham Amr Bahgat; Gamal Bakry, CG; Mohsen Barada, FURP, Medhat Dorrah, SPACE; Samir Gharib, CDF;  Zaki Hawwas, Ain Sham University; Abdel Baki Ibrahim, CAPS; Bernard O’Kane, AUC; Magda Metwally, GOGBPR; Amr Noema, CU; Ali Raffat, CU; Huda Sakr, GOPP; Mohamad Sameh, CU; Zakia Shafie, CU; Mohsen Zahran, Alexandria University.

SESSIONS COMMITTEE
Tarek Abu Zekry, Dieter ACkernecht, Nadia Al-Hasani, Saleh Al-Hathloul, Mohammed Awad, William Bechhoefer, Juan Fernando Bontempo, Hugh Burgess, Giancarlo Cataldi, Pierre Clement, Jefferey Cook, Howard Davis, Aly Gabr, Vivienne Japha, Mui Ho, Anne Hublin, Heng Chye Kiang, A nthony King, Done Krueckberg, Michael Landzelius, Morna Livingstone, Robert Mugerauer, Paul Oliver, Attilio Petruccioli, Marcela Pizzi, Ahmad Refaat, Shahdan Shabka, Manuel Teixeira, Gunawan Tjahjono, Naila Toulon, Dell Upton, Tarek Waly, Carol Martin Watts, Donald Watts, John Webster.

CONFERENCE SPONSORS
Cairo University (Office of the President/Department of Architecture;
Ministry of Higher Education; Ministry of Culture; Ministry of Tourism; Ministry of Housing and New Communities, Arab Republic of Egypt; University of California, Berkeley (Center for Environmental Design Research/ Center for Middle Eastern Studies); Cultural Development Fund, Cairo; Mohandes Bank, Cairo; Med Tours, Cairo; General Organization for Physical Planning, Cairo; The Architecture Committee, High Council for Culture, Cairo; CPC Contractors, Cairo; Arab Contractors Company, Cairo; Office of his Excellency, Mohamad Said Farsi, Jeddah; Arab Urban Development Institute, Riyadh.

CONFERENCE SITE AND TRAVEL AGENT
The conference will be held at the Hotel Sofitel Maadi, Cairo, Egypt. In order to avail of special conference rates, hotel reservations- accompanied by full payment will have to be made with the designated travel agent by September 1, 1998. Additional excursions to Sinai (St. Catherine’s) and the Red Sea (Sharm el Sheikh) and/or Nile cruises from Luxor to Aswan will also be available at IASTE starting February, 1998.

Send all inquiries to:
IASTE ’98 Conference, Center for Environmental Design Research
390 Wurster Hall, University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-1839, USA
Phone: 510.642.6801/510.642.2896
Fax: 510.643.5571

E-mail: iaste@ced.berkeley.edu

IASTE 2000 Conference Location: Trani, Italy

trani.jpg (143901 bytes)
T R A N I     I T A L YThe conference will be held in historic Trani, Italy at the Castello Svevo in northwest Trani.  A map of the City of Trani is above.  Locations of key conference hotels as well as the train station are highlighted for your convenience.  For more information on the castle and on Trani, please visit the following web sites:

http://www.idria.com/trani_en.html

http://www.castelli-puglia.org/en/trani.html

http://www.inmedia.it/Puglia/eng/murge/trani.htm

IASTE 2000 Conference Program

IASTE 2000: The End of Tradition?

Trani, Italy—October 12-15, 2000

CONFERENCE PROGRAM


Thursday, October 12
8:00 AM-9:00 AM—REGISTRATION
Castello Svevo, second level


9:00 AM—10:40 AM–Opening Session
Room A

 

Welcome Remarks
Attilio Petruccioli
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy
Antonio Castorani
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

On the Conference Theme: The End of Tradition
Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Plenary Address
Chair: Mauro Mezzina
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

What does Tradition Mean for Architecture?
Francesco Dal Co
Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia, Italy


10:40 AM—10:55 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:55 AM – 1:05 PM—Paper Sessions


A.1 Territorial Implications for a Placeless Society
Room A

Chair: Aly Gabr
Cairo University, Egypt

 

Superimposed Horizons: Existence at the Intersection of the Real and the Virtual
Brian Cavanaugh
Harvard University, Cambridge, USA

 

Seoul’s Web Site and “Virtual Seoul” Video Game: Toward the End of a Traditional Urban Vision?
Marie-Helene Fabre Faustino
Laboratoire Theorie des Mutations Urbaines, Paris, France

 

Civilization Without Territory, Territory Without Civilization
Anna Menghini
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Patterns of Adaptation: Place, Placelessness, and Beirut’s Population, 1975-1990
Sofia Shwayri
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Traditional Settlements: So Far, No Further?
Raid Hanna
University of Glasgow, United Kingdom


B.1 Usurping Traditional Forms: Stabilization or Homogenization?
Room B

Chair: Paul Oliver
Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom

 

The “Ontario” Cottage: the Globalization of a British Form During the Nineteenth Century
Lynne DiStefano
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Destabilization and Homogenization of the Culture and Architecture of Southwestern Sumba Island, Indonesia
Joanna Mross
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA

 

Past/Present: New Urbanism and the Salvage Paradigm
Amy Murphy
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

 

Urban Heritage Protection Practices and Their Homogenizing Effects: The Case of Old Quebec
Anne Vallieres
Université Laval, Sainte Foy, Canada

 

Variations on Place and Identity: The Production of Kitsch in Turkish Architecture of the Post-1980s
Didem Kilickiran
University College London, United Kingdom


C.1 Technology and the Making of Urban Landscapes
Room C

Chair: Jeffrey Cook
Arizona State University, Tempe, USA

 

The House That Breathes: On the Extinction of Sangirese Architectural Tradition
Gunawan Tjahjono
University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

 

The Architectural Organism: Tradition and Changes
Michele Beccu
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Voids: The Re-Presentation of Culture
Li Lian Chee
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Making Urban Landscape by Disclosing Traditional Buildings: The Case of Tochigi City in Japan
Nobuo Mitsuhashi and Nobuyoshi Fujimoto
Utsunomiya University, Japan

 

Underground Quarry Tradition: An Alternative to an Antropic Landscape
Calogero Montalbano
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy


1:05 PM – 2:40 PM
BREAK


2:40 PM – 4:15 PM
Plenary Session: Globalization, Deterrorialization and the End of Tradition
Room A
Chair: Harrison Fraker
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

The Global Domestic: Deterritorializing Globalization
Jane M. Jacobs
University of Melbourne, Australia

 

Tourism’s Exclusionary Practices in Cancun, Cuba, and Southern Florida: Consumption and Protection of Traditional Environments
Robert Mugerauer
University of Washington, Seattle, USA

 

Discussant
Mark Jarzombek
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA


4:15 PM – 6:00 PM
Trani Walking Tour


6:15 PM – 7:15 PM
Special Panel Session—Emerging Technology for Heritage: Examples from Italy
Room A
Chair: Alonzo C. Addison
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Panelists:
Bernard Frischer
University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Marco Gaiani
Polytechnic of Milan, Italy


7:15 pm – 7:45 pm
Tour of Castello Svevo


8:00 PM – 10:00 PM—Opening Reception
Castello Svevo


Friday, October 13, 2000

8:30 AM – 10:45 AM—Paper Sessions


A.2 “Local” Traditions in the Post-imperial/Colonial City
Room A
Chair: Mia Fuller
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Made in Hong Kong, Made in Macau: A Tale of Two Post-colonial Cities
David Lung
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Permanence/Impermanence in Creole Style, French West Indies
Anne Hublin
Ecole d’Architecture, Paris Villemin, France

 

The Colonial Transformation of Seoul: Tradition, Westernization and Space
Changmii Bae
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

 

The End or Rebirth of Spatial Tradition in Taiwan: The Spatial Meaning of Historic Cities in Transition
Pai-hwai Wu and Min-Fu Hsu
Ming Chuan University and National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, ROC

 

Permanency and Transformation in the Historic Site: the Case of Tiradentes, Brazil
Jurema Rugani
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil


B.2 Mobile/izing Spatial Scales: the Shifting Politics of Tradition
Room B
Chair: Michael Landzelius
Oxford University, United Kingdom

 

Vernacular Architecture and the Park Removals: Traditionalization as Justification and Resistance
Michael Ann Williams
Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, USA

 

Traditional Fictions: Narratives of Nature, Culture and Exchange in the Gift Garden
Gini Lee Dip
University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

 

A Satellite Dish and a Bamboo Hut? The Politics of Traditional Environments in Indonesia
Leena Avonius
University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

It’s All In a Name: The Loss of Expertise and the Recovery of Tradition
Peter Schneider
University of Colorado, Denver, USA

 

Turning and Breaking a Century: A Search for Socio-Political Continuity Through the Ruptures in Shanghai Political History
Vimalin Rujivacharakul
University of California, Berkeley, USA


C.2 Discourses of Tradition and Globalization
Room C
Chair: Gunawan Tjahjono
University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

 

“Tradition by Itself…”
Paul Oliver
Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom

 

Vernacular as Invented Tradition
Rowan Roenisch
De Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom

 

The Dialectic Between Tradition and Innovation in Italian Typological Studies
Nicola Marzot
University of Bologna, Italy

 

Redefining Tradition for Multiple Geographies: Towards Juxtaposed Traditions and the Case of Islam in Istanbul as a Discursive Act
Berin Gur
Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

 

The Insidious Revival of Tradition: Invisible Fences
Antonella Romagnolo
University of Reggio Calabria, Italy


10:45 AM – 11:00 AM
COFFEE BREAK


11:00 AM – 12:40 PM
Plenary Session: The End of Tradition: Scholarly Discourses
Room A
Chair: Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

The End is Near: Apocalypse and Utopia in Contemporary Thought
Katharyne Mitchell
University of Washington, Seattle, USA

 

Traditions of the Modern: A Corrupt View
Ananya Roy
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Discussant:
Jeffrey Cody
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong


12:40 PM – 2:00 PM
BREAK


2:00 PM – 4:10 PM—Paper Sessions


A.3 Localizing Global Traditions: Contemporary Scenarios
Room A
Chair: Jeffrey Cody
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Localizing Global Traditions in Egyptian Architecture: The Issue of Collective Identity
Aly Gabr and Khaled Ahmed Kamel
Cairo University, Egypt

 

Identity as a Mode of Resistance to Globalization: Perspectives from the United States and Italy
Pietro Cali and Christopher Jarrett
University of Reggio Calabria and Georgia Institute of Technology, Italy/USA

 

Localizing Global Architectural Traditions: Postmodern Interpretations in Curitiba, Brazil
Clara Irazabal
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Cultural Complexes: Recuperating Tradition for the Global Marketplace
Sabir Khan and Mark Cottle
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA

 

Villard de Lans: Global Intervention and Local Resurgence
Jacqueline Victor and Laurence Keith Loftin III
University of Denver and University of Colorado, Denver, USA


B.3 Preservation Paradigms in Education and Practice
Room B
Chair: Dieter Ackerknecht
City of Zurich, Switzerland

 

Teaching Architects Tradition
William Bechhoefer
University of Maryland, College Park, USA

 

The Urban Code and the Re-Foundation of the Normative Instruments Governing Territory Use
Paolo Bertozzi and Agnese Ghini
University of Parma and DAPT, Italy

 

New Hopi Village: Housing Community for Sustainability
Jeffrey Cook
Arizona State University, Tempe, USA

 

The Conservation of the Building Typology of Two Traditional Buildings in
the Trentino Region
Antonio Frattari and Michela Dalpra
University of Trento, Italy

 

Al Torjuman Project: Multiculturalism as a New Paradigm
Dalila Elkerdany
Cairo University, Egypt


C.3 Learning from Place: The Culture of Building
Room C
Chair: Manuel Teixeira
ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Not Quite the End of Tradition: The Building Culture of Lalitpur, Nepal
Howard Davis
University of Oregon, Eugene, USA

 

Eastern Sicily Historical Resorts: Between Continuity and Transformation
Fabio Todesco
University of Reggio Calabria, Italy

 

Correlations of Spatial Use and House Forms Across Austronesia
Lai Chee-Kien
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Building Architecture and Design Architecture in Japan
Hajo Neis
University of Oregon, Portland, USA

 

Historical Architectures, Urban Retraining, and Maintenance of a Patrimony at Risk in Italy
Massimo Lo Curzio
University of Reggio Calabria, Italy


4:10 PM – 4:25 PM
COFFEE BREAK


4:25 PM – 6:35 PM—Paper Sessions


A.4 Localizing Global Traditions: Historic Precedents
Room A
Chair: Marcela Pizzi
University of Chile, Santiago, Chile

 

The Remaking of Cairo: Looking at the Nineteenth Century for Inspiration
Heba Ahmed
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

The Postcolonial City: Aspects of the Architecture and Urban Design of Dar es Salaam
Erik Sigge and Kim Einarsson
Goteborg University, Sweden

 

Commerce and Culture: Continuity and Change
Nadia Alhasani
American University of Sharjah, UAE

 

Maintaining Environmental Identity as an Urban Design Methodology for the Contemporary City: The Example of Civita Castellana
Marco Maretto
University of Genova, Italy

 

Seventeenth-Century Works of Fortification as a Process of Globalization: The Adaptation to Traditional Urban Structures
Margarida Valla
Universidade Lusiada, Lisbon, Portugal


B.4 Architects and Planners as Traditionalists
Room B
Chair: Weijen Wang
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

The End of Internationalism: The Issue of Translation, from the Recovery of Tradition to Betrayal
Marta Alieri
University of Genova, Italy

 

A Detached Engagement: Tradition and the Poetics of Émigré Practice
Sabir Khan and Mark Cottle
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA

 

Sandstone’s Unifying Hue: The World Bank Delhi Regional Mission Headquarters Building in Historical Perspective
Samia Rab
American University of Sharjah, UAE

 

Crafting Tradition: The Laurie Baker Phenomenon
Malini Krishnankutty
Sir JJ College of Architecture, Mumbai, India

 

A Case for Modernity and Tradition
Ela Cil
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA


C.4 “Traditional” Knowledge: Learning from Experience
Room C
Chair: Anne Hublin
Ecole d’Architecture, Paris Villemin, France

 

The Lore of the Master Builder: Working with Local Materials and Local Knowledge in Sana’a, Yemen
Trevor Marchand
School of Oriental and African Studies, London, United Kingdom

 

Wooden Architecture and Earthquakes in Turkey
Stephen Tobriner
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Tradition and New Technologies in Northern Italian Building Practice
Anna Barozzi and Luca Guardigli
University of Bologna and University of Parma, Italy

 

A New Role for Traditional Knowledge: the Creation of a Technological Paradigm for Saving Natural Resources
Pietro Laureano
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Pax Machina: Tradition and The Challenges of Technological Transfer
Hazem Ziada
Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


Saturday, October 14, 2000

8:30 AM – 10:40 AM—Paper Sessions


A.5 Discourses of Place/Deterritorialization
Room A
Chair: Samia Rab
American University of Sharjah, UAE

 

Dresden’s Kulturmeile and the Heterology of Bauen
Mark Jarzombek
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA

 

Representing Culture: Resisting Globalization through the Transformation of Tradition
Lisa Findley
California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco, USA

 

Local and Traditional Environments as a Part of Today’s Region
Eeva Aarrevaara
Helsinki University of Technology, Finland

 

The End of Tradition/The Re-Invention of Tradition: Storytelling and Building in a Changing World
Leonardo Castriota
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

 

The Conception of Space Among the San: Space and Society in the Kalahari Desert
Giovanni Fontana Antonelli
UNESCO, Windhoek, Namibia


B.5 Invented Nations/Invented Traditions: Identity and Space
Room B
Chair: Derek Japha
University of Cape Town, South Africa

 

Manufacturing Architectural Identity
Howayda Al-Harithy
American University of Beirut, Lebanon

 

Remembering through Space: A Communal Hall in Postcolonial Hong Kong
Sidney Chin Hung Cheung
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Contemplation on Built Heritage in Ireland: Between Destruction and Preservation
Rumiko Handa
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA

 

State Image and Space in Post-war Cairo: The Case of Tahrir Square from 1940-1970
Hesham Khairy Abdelfattah
Cairo University, Egypt

 

A Gift for the Enemy: Pre-Islamic Concepts, Forms and Icons on the Javanese Mosque
Hendrajaya Isnaeni
University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia


C.5 Tourism, Commodification and the Construction of Tradition
Room C
Chair: John Webster
University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia

 

Tourism and the Regional Construction of an Albertian Tradition
Magdalena Saura
Technic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

 

More Irish than the Irish: The Commodification of Ethnic Identity
Kymberly Helbig
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

 

Searching for Meaning: The Use of Industrial Tradition to Define Meaning in an Age of Global Tourism and Placelessness
Christine Landorf
University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

 

Sheep Station Settlements in Patagonia at the Turn of the Century: The Construction of Tradition and Revitalization Through Tourism
Marcela Pizzi and Maria Paz Valenzuela
University of Chile, Santiago, Chile

 

The Smallest Village in the World: Montafon, Austria
Gabriela Muri
University of Zurich, Switzerland


10:40 AM – 10:55 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:55 AM – 1:05 PM—Paper Sessions


A.6 Marketing, Consumption, and the Traditions of Place
Room A
Chair: David Lung
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Marketing Tradition: Post-Traditional Places and Meta-Urbanism
Lineu Castello
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

 

The Re-creation of Historic Sites Between Fantasy and Reality: What Las Vegas Learned
Basil Kamel
Cairo University, Egypt

 

The Consuming Strategies of Yangpyong: Megalopolitan Seoul and Its Influence on Surrounding Cities
Bong-hee Jeon and Won-Joon Choi
Seoul National University, Korea

 

The Struggle for Urban Space: Self-Identity in the Shadows of Globalization
Amer Moustafa
American University of Sharjah, UAE

 

New Planning Versus Traditional Planning: Croatian Experience
Nenad Lipovac
University of Zagreb, Croatia


B.6 Invented Nations/Invented Traditions: Architectural Discourses
Room B
Chair: Greig Crysler
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Tradition as a Means to the End of Tradition: Italian Fascist New Towns in the 1930s
Mia Fuller
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Reinventing Singapore’s Chinatown
Heng Chye Kiang and Quah Cheng Ee
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

The Turkification of Istanbul in the 1950s
Ipek Akpinar
University College London, United Kingdom

 

Portuguese Traditional Urbanism, the Synthesis of Vernacular and Intellectual Models
Manuel Teixeira
ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Searching for a National Architecture: The Architectural Discourse in Early Republican Turkey
T. Elvan Ergut
Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey


C.6 Tourism, Consumption, and Tradition
Room C
Chair: Mike Austin
UNITEC Institute of Architecture, Auckland, New Zealand

 

Preservation Versus Profit: Recent Development in Village Tourism in China
Puay-Peng Ho
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Tradition for the “Other”: On Vernacular Architecture and Tourism in Yongding
County, China
Duanfang Lu
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Kalekoy: A Mediterranean Village Frozen in Time for Global Touristic Consumption
Gaye Culcuoglu and Emine Incirlioglu
Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey

 

Modernity of Tradition and the Tradition of Modernity: Legacies of the Spanish Village and the German Pavilion at Barcelona
Donald Watts
Kansas State University, Manhattan, USA

 

Uzbekistan: In the Shadow of Tradition
Manu Sobti
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA


1:05 AM – 2:30 PM
BREAK


Meeting of IASTE Advisory Board Members
Castello Svevo


2:30 PM – 4:15 PM—Paper Sessions


A.7 Mutations of Language and the Making of Place
Room A
Chair: Frank Sun
Center for Architectural Research and Education, Hong Kong

 

Words and Buildings
Rosemary Latter
Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom

 

From the “Chinese Town” to the “Medina”: The Transformation of the Hui Muslim District in Xi’an
Jean-Paul Loubes
Ecole d’Architecture, Bordeaux, France

 

Intracultural Negotiations in the Nepalese Traditional Landscape: Cast(e)ing Off the Chains that Bind
William Duncanson
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Mao’s China: the Option of Beauty, the Absence of History, the End of Tradition
Jeffrey Hartnett
University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA


B.7 Reconstruction and the Politics of Space
Room B
Chair: Morna Livingston
Philadelphia University, USA

nbsp;

Rebuilding Bosnia: An International Project for the City of Mostar
Judith Bing
Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA

 

Importing Architecture: The Case of Beirut
Elie George Haddad and Charles Meyer
Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon

 

Israelizing Jerusalem: The Contribution of the Postwar Architectural Discipline
Alona Nitzan-Shiftan
Technion, Haifa, USA

 

Tabula Rasa as Tradition: Rebuilding Manchester Again
Eamonn Canniffe
University of Sheffield, United Kingdom


C.7 Reconfiguring the Dwelling
Room C
Chair: Mui Ho
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Rethinking Tradition: Another Look at the Essential Characteristics and Meanings of the Traditional Thai House
Piyalada Devakula
Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

 

Home Cooking, Nostalgia, and the Purchase of Tradition
Jean Duruz
University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

 

Lean Silver Boxes and Living Traditions: The Changing Identity of the Australian Kitchen
Jane Lawrence and Rachel Hurst
University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

 

The Digital Hall: Technology and the Tradition of the Single-Family House
June Williamson
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA


4:15 PM – 4:30 PM
COFFEE BREAK


4:30 PM – 6:40 PM—Paper Sessions


A.8 Sites and Agents of Globalization
Room A
Chair: Donald Watts
Kansas State University, Lawrence, USA

 

The Architectures of Globalization: Places, Practices and Pedagogies
Greig Crysler
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Cosmetic Heritage: The Fabrication of Pedestrian Shopping Streets in South China, 1993-2000
Jeffrey Cody and Wallace Chang
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Familiarity on the Frontlines: Accommodating U.S. Military Bases Abroad
Mark L. Gillem
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Main Streets and Shopping Centers: Between Local Traditions and Placeless Sites of Consumption
Gianpiero Moretti
McGill University, Montreal, Canada

 

The Shifting Presence of the Turkish Village: Are They (Still) Important?
Alison Snyder
University of Oregon, Eugene, USA


B.8 The Rhetoric of Tradition: the Co-option of Participation
Room B
Chair: Basil Kamel
Cairo University, Egypt

 

Tradition as You Like It: Transformations of Traditional Dwellings in Kyoto and Plovdiv from an Anthropological Perspective
Milena Metalkova-Markova
Kyoto Institute of Technology, Japan

 

Urban Invasions and New Traditions of Self-Build Construction
Paul Simpson
University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

 

The Unstated Agressions of Tradition: Preservation at What Cost?
J. Brooke Harrington
Temple University, Philadelphia, USA

 

Shackitecture: a Never-Ending Tradition?
John Webster
University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia

 

Placing People First: Participatory Approaches to a Sustainable Future in Tambacounda, Senegal
Emmanuel Ede and Ekkehard Stuckemann
University of Hannover, Germany


C.8 Civil Society and the Space of Resistance
Room C
Chair: Heng Chye Kiang
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Informality and Everyday Urbanism: Between Planning Practices and Political Discourse in Contemporary Cairo
Omar Nagati
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Indigeneous Planning
Ted Jojola
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA

 

Civil Society and The Space of Resistance: Tadeusz Kantor’s and Daniel Libeskind’s Technology of Anamnesis
Michal Kobialka
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA

 

Traditions and the Spaces of Resistance: Taos Indians’ Contestation for Blue Lake, and an “Indian Memorial” at the Little Big Horn Battlefield
Lynn Paxson
Iowa State University, Ames, USA

 

Regional Inflections: A Study of the Passage and Mall as Civic Connectors
Sevinç Yavuz
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA


Sunday, October 15, 2000

8:30 AM – 10:40 AM—Paper Sessions


A.9 Practice and the Rise of Post-traditional Places
Room A
Chair: Howard Davis
niversity of Oregon, Eugene, USA

 

Preserving Cultural Legacies in Affordable Housing: Case Studies from South Africa and Nigeria
Abimbola Asojo and Betty Harris
University of Oklahoma, Norman, USA

 

Council Housing in Transition: The Transformation of a Prototype House in Indonesia
Endang T.S. Darjosanjoto
University of Manchester, United Kingdom

 

Public Housing: Between Controlled Space and Contested Space
Rachel Kallus
Technion, Haifa, Israel

 

Remembering the Tradition: “Vernacular Usage” and the Spirit of Modernity in Contemporary Social Housing Estates in Vienna
Marina Pecar
Kansas State University, Lawrence, USA

 

Telematic Supports to Housing in the Marginalized Mountain Territories: A Project in the Friuli V. Giulia Region
Mauro Bertagnin
University of Udine, Italy


B.9 Historic Neighborhoods and Landscapes
Room B
Chair: William Bechhoefer
University of Maryland, College Park, USA

 

Tradition, Innovation, Landscape: Toward a Correct Use of Typological Values
Enrico Genovesi
University of Rome, Italy

 

Modernity or Contemporary Tradition? A Study of Residential Buildings in a Historic Neighborhood of Cairo
Debora Rodrigues and Seif el din El Rashidi
Aga Khan Cultural Services, USA/Egypt

 

The End of Traditional Landscape? Looking for Cultural Landscape Relics in Italy’s Asolo Region
Giorgio Gianighian and Matteo Paolucci
University of East London and IUAV, Venice, Italy

 

The Old Alley and Traditional Urban Housing in Seoul
Inho Song
University of Seoul, Korea

 

Tradition and Modernity in the Architecture of Apulian Farms
Mauro Scionti and Cito Lucio Adriano
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy


C.9 Practice and Technologies of Materials
Room C
Chair: Nicola Costantino
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Remedial Treatment of Humidity Damage in Historic Buildings
Chiara Campo and Michele Stella
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

In Pursuit of a Contemporary Form for Stone Architecture
Marco Mannino and Carlo Moccia
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Masonry Techniques of Construction in Apulia, Italy
Dino Mongell
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

The Stone Envelope: Design Methods for Contemporary Urban Facades in the North European Metropolis
Eliana de Nichilo
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy


10:40 AM – 10:55 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:55 AM – 12:40 PM—Paper Sessions


A.10 Globalizing the Local
Room A
Chair: Juan Fernando Bontempo
University of Guadalajara, Mexico

 

The Spatial Foundation of Urbanism in Yazd, Iran
Rafi Samizay
Washington State University, Pullman, USA

 

Globalizing the Local: Media Representations of Hong Kong’s Urban Landscape
Weijen Wang and Li-Tsui Fu
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Cultural Identity and Architectural Image in the Bo-Kaap, Cape Town
Derek Japha and Fabio Todeschini
University of Cape Town, South Africa


B.10 Architecture and the Making of Tradition
Room B
Chair: Lisa Findley
California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco, USA

 

Bread and Building in Mértola
Fernando Varanda
Universidade Lusofona, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Louis Kahn in Dhaka: From Universalism to Nationalism
Maryam Gusheh
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

 

Innovation/Tradition, Globalization/Genius Loci: A Case Study of Castiglione, Sicily
Maria Anna Caminiti
University of Reggio Calabria, Italy

 

Between Two Worlds: Chinese Huiguan Architecture
in the Malacca Straits
Mei Qing
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong


C.10 Architectural Discourses on Tradition and Globalization
Room C
Chair: Nadia Alhasani
American University of Sharjah, UAE

 

The Territory Around Etna: Discourses of Place or Deterritorialization?
Giuseppe Arcidiacono
University of Reggio Calabria, Italy

 

The Discipline of Building: Traditional Architecture as the Basis of Modern Design
Giovanni Leoni
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

Cultural Hybridity in the Architecture of Eastern Poland
Andrzej Piotrowski
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA

 

Toward Post-Traditional Settlement: The Role of Meaning in the Formation of Common Space
Mas Santosa
Institute of Technology Surabaya, Indonesia


12:40 PM – 2:15 PM
BREAK


2:15 PM – 2:45 PM
Plenary Address
Room A
Chair: Attilio Petruccioli
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy

 

The Contemporary Architectural Project and its Construction
Claudio d’Amato Guerrieri
Polytechnic of Bari, Italy


2:45 PM – 4:30 PM—Paper Sessions


A.11 Localizing the Global
Room A
Chair: Hajo Neis
University of Oregon, Portland, USA

 

“Discipline” in the Built Environment: Cairo’s Landscape, Between Western Effects and Local Responses
Mohamed Abdel-KaderM
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Localizing Global Traditions or Globalizing Local Traditions? Rural Settlements on Madura Island, Indonesia
Muhammad Faqih
University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

 

Neighbors Make Good Fences: Medieval Myths and Talmudic Tales in the Hampstead Garden Suburb
Jennifer Rachel Cousineau
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Nineteenth Century Globalization: Transforming the Historic Center of Cairo
Yasser Elsheshtawy
UAE University, Al Ain, UAE


B.11 Deterritorialization and the Geography of Tradition
Room B
Chair: Stephen Tobriner
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Tradition, Propaganda and Power
James Steele
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

 

From Deterritorialization to Reterritorialization: Glocalization and the Imagined Geographies of Emerging Cross-Border Regions
Matthew Sparke
University of Washington, Seattle, USA

 

The Origin of “World Heritage”
Walter Lanchet
University of Tours, France

 

Tradition and Contemporary Architecture in South and Southeast Asia: New Directions for the Future
Joseph Aranha
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA


C.11 Preserving Traditional Settlements: Field Challenges
Room C
Chair: Dalila ElKerdany
Cairo University, Egypt

 

House Hunting or I’ve Never “Lived” in My House
Andre Casault
Université Laval, Quebec, Canada

 

An Authentic Future? Contemporary Aspects of Traditional Building Aspiration and Process in Eastern Tibet
Suzanne Ewing
University of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

 

Defining Territory for the People Along the Ciliwung River in Jakarta
Yulia Nurliani Harahap
University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia

 

Village Culture Resources Development: A Study of Adaptive Reuse of a Hakka Village and Its Environs
Alex Lui
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong


4:30 PM – 4:45 PM
COFFEE BREAK


4:45 PM – 6:45 PM
Final Plenary Panel
Room A
Chairs: Jean-Paul Bourdier, Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

Commentators:
Katharyne Mitchell
University of Washington, Seattle, USA

 

Robert Mugerauer
University of Washington, Seattle, USA

 

Discussants:
Jane M. Jacobs
University of Melbourne, Australia

 

Ananya Roy
University of California, Berkeley, USA


8:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Closing Reception

IASTE 2000 Conference Description

The End of Tradition?

Conference Description

As we approach the next millennium, there is a great deal of contentious debate regarding the “end of history”, the “end of geography”, and the “end of tradition”. The emergence of the term “post”, as in post-developmentalism, post-modernism and now post-traditionalism, serves as an indicator of our present day discourse.  In past conferences, IASTE scholars and practitioners have attempted to make sense of this ever-changing intellectual landscape and have grappled with how processes of globalization are irrevocably restructuring space and place. This conference will be concerned with a specific historical moment, one where a seemingly all-consuming late capitalism levels differences and particularities, but where there is at the same time a resurgence of localisms, populisms, and fundamentalisms. It is this paradoxical simultaneity which necessitates our question: The End of Tradition?

IASTE has always been an unconventional intellectual space, drawing upon the strengths of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural investigations.   Perhaps it is now time to extend this unconventionality to our analytical strategies. We thus propose an interrogation of the traditions of “place”, for the “End of Tradition” should also be interpreted as a dislocation of intellectual traditions as well.

Pre-registration Information

Interested scholars who wish to pre-register for the conference should send a request with name, affiliation, and mailing address. Payment should be in US dollars in the form of check, money order, or international bank draft in the amount of $375.00 made payable to University of California Regents.  All conference presenters must pre-register in order to be included in the final program. Pre-registration fees do not cover the expenses of travel and accomodations. For more information, contact:

IASTE 2000
Center for Environmental Design Research
390 Wurster Hall
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-1839, USA

Phone:  510.642.6801/510.642.2896
Fax: 510.643.5571
E-mail:    iaste@uclink4.berkeley.edu

Conference Site and Travel Agent

The conference will be held at the Castello Svevo in Trani, Italy north of the city of Bari.  Hotel and travel arrangements should be made directly with the designated travel agency. A number of one day and half day trips to nearby sites will also be available after the conference through this travel agent to conference participants for an additional fee. These include Castel del Monte, Apulia, and Alberobello.

For detailed information and reservations, contact:

Interprogram
Contact person: Ms. Giusy Fotia
Via Calefati 89
Bari, Italy
Phone 39.080.521.2853
Fax 39.080.521.2868
Email user788@pangeanet.it

Organizing Committee

Nezar AlSayyad, Conference Director, University of California, Berkeley
Attilio Petruccioli, Conference Local Co-Director, Polytechnic of Bari
Jean-Paul Bourdier, Conference Co-Director, University of California, Berkeley
Michele Stella, Conference Local Coordinator, Istituto per la Residenza e le Infrastrutture Sociali (IRIS)
Montira Horayangura, Conference Coordinator, University of California, Berkeley
Mark Gillem, IASTE Coordinator, University of California, Berkeley
Nora Watanabe, Conference Administrator, University of California, Berkeley

Advisory Committee and Session Chairs

Dieter Ackerknecht, Mike Austin, William Bechhoefer, Juan Fernando Bontempo, Hugh Burgess, Antonio Castorani, Jeffrey Cody, Nicola Costantino, Jeffrey Cook, Greig Crysler, Claudio D’Amato Guerrieri, Howard Davis, Vicente Del Rio, Dalila Elkerdany, Lisa Findley, Harrison Fraker, Mia Fuller, Aly Gabr, Mui Ho, Anne Hublin, Derek Japha, Basil Kamel, Heng Chye Kiang, Michael Landzelius, Morna Livingston, David Lung, Robert Mugerauer, Hajo Neis, Paul Oliver, Marcela Pizzi, Samia Rab, Ananya Roy, Manuel Teixeira, Gunawan Tjahjono, Steven Tobriner, Weijen Wang, Donald J. Watts, John Webster, Christopher Yip

Conference Sponsors

Faculty of Architecture, Polytechnic of Bari, Italy
Center for Environmental Design Research and the College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley, USA
IRIS, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy
Municipality of Trani, Italy
Banco del Monte dei Paschi di Siena, Italy
Sovrintendenza ai Beni Ambientali, Architettonici, Artistici e Storici della Puglia, Italy
Provincia di Bari, Italy
Regione Puglia, Assessorato al Turismo, Italy

  Optional Excursions

A number of one day and half day trips to nearby sites will also be available after the conference to conference participants for an additional fee.  These include Castel del Monte, Apalia, and Aberobello.

IASTE 2002 Conference Program

(U N) B O U N D I N G T R A D I T I O N :

The Tensions of Borders and Regions

Hong Kong, China—December 12-15, 2004

CONFERENCE PROGRAM


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2002

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM—REGISTRATION
LUXEMBOURG ROOM III


8:45 AM – 9:50 AM—OPENING SESSION
VERSAILLES

Opening Addresses
Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley

 

David Lung
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Welcome Remarks
Professor Tsui Lap Chee
University of Hong Kong, China

 

On the Conference Theme: [Un]Bounding Tradition
Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


9:50 AM – 10:10 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:10 AM – 12:00 AM—PLENARY SESSION:
DWELLING AND SPACE: RECONFIGURING TRADITION

VERSAILLES
Chairs: Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.
 
David Lung
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Traditional Environments and Any-Space-Whatever
Ackbar Abbas
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Belonging
Neil Leach
University of Bath, Bath, U.K.

 

Discussant:
Ananya Roy
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
BREAK


1:00 PM – 2:50 PM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.1 GLOBAL NETWOKS: UNBOUNDING THE CITY
VERSAILLES
Chair: Jeffey Cook
Arizona State University, Tempe, U.S.A.

 

Redefining Bangalore: Global Networks and the Contemporary City
John Stallmeyer
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

The East/West Intersection: On Palms, Sails, and Globalization In Dubai, U.A.E.
Yasser Hassan Elsheshtawy
United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, U.A.E.

 

Redefining Space: Between Castells’ “Space Of Flows” and Betty’s “Cyberspace”
Hesham Abdelfattah
Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

 

From On-Line To Off-Line: The Emergence of a New Urban Community In The Age Of Information Technology
Sung-Hong Kim and Jong Ho Yi
University of Seoul, Seoul, Korea


B.1 LOCATING “AUTHENTICITY”
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Lynne DiStefano
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Identifying Traditional Thai Marketplaces From People’s Attitudes Toward Them
Apichoke Lekagul
Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

 

Border Architecture And The Interaction Between Ethnic Groups: Transformation Of A Watchtower In Taiwan
Min-Fu Hsu and Mei-Fang Kuo
National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan

 

Ethnicity And Urban Design In Bali: Reinventing Desa Adat As An Urban Design Unit
Nirarta Samadhi
National Institute of Technology, Malang, Indonesia

 

The Sustainability Of Chinese Shophouses In Asia And Southeast Asia In The Contemporary World
Widya Sujana
Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, U.K.


C.1 COLONIAL HYBRIDITY
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Alona Nitzan-Shiftan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.

 

Architectural and Historiographical Traditions Unbounded: Italian and Arab Villages in 1930s Libya
Mia Fuller
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Negotiating Boundary and Constituting Identity: The Urban Typologies of Four Asian Port Cities
Weijin Wang
University of Hong Kong, China

 

The Evolutionary Development of Asmara: Colony to Hybridity
Edward Denison and Guang Yu Ren
Pulborough, U.K.

 

Tradition, Identity, and the Contemporary Built Environment in Zimbabwe
Joseph Aranha
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, U.S.A.


2:50 PM – 3:10 PM
COFFEE BREAK


3:10 PM – 5:00 PM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.2 POLITICS OF CARTOGRAPHY
VERSAILLES
Chair: Harrison Fraker
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

A Matrix Landscape for the Remapping of a Pyrenees Border
Magda Saura
Technic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

 

Tribal Borders and their Exclusion of Sacred Space
Anne Lawrason Marshall
University of Idaho, Moscow, U.S.A.

 

Mental Maps and Shifting Settlements: The Invisible Boundaries of the Zimbabwean Musha
Rowan Roenisch
De Montfort University, Leicester, U.K.

 

Drawing Boundaries: Vernacular Architecture in Maps
Marcel Vellinga
Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, U.K.


B.2 PLACING “AUTHENTICITY”
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Mui Ho
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Traditional Dwellings, Conservation, and Land Use: A Study of Three Villages in Sai Kung, Hong Kong
Sidney Cheung
Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

 

Typological Evolution of the Built Tradition in Tai O, Hong Kong
Wai-Keung Yeung
City University of Hong Kong, China

 

Beyond the Built Environment: Revealing (In)Visible Borders in a Brazilian Landscape
Leonardo Castriota
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

 

“Authenticity” as a Tension of Global and Local Values
Ipek Akpinar and Semra Aydinli
Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey


C.2 PERFORMING IDENTITY
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Gunawan Tjahjono
University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia

 

Technology as Mediator: The Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Center, New Caledonia
Susan Frosten
Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, U.S.A.

 

Bantering and Magic: Policing Access to Djienne’s Building Trade with Jests and Spells
Trevor Marchand
SOAS, London, U.K.

 

Eating at the Borders: Culinary Journeys
Jean Duruz
University of South Australia, Australia

 

A Place Of Identity and Fear: Boundaries Experienced in a “Gypsy” Quarter in Ankara
Emine Incirlioglu
Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey


6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
OPENING RECEPTION
HONG KONG SCIENCE MUSEUM

Dim Sum will be served

 

Hosts
Mr. Paul Leung
Leisure and Cultural Services Department, Hong Kong, China

 

Mr. Edward Ho
Council of Lord Wilson Heritage Trust


8:00 PM– 10:00 PM
Special viewing of the History Museum for IASTE participants


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2002

8:45 AM – 10:35 AM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.3 RETHINKING HISTORIOGRAPHY AND DISCOURSE
VERSAILLES
Chair: Mia Fuller
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

The Heritage (In Between): Discourses of “Region” and “Nation” in Bilad Al Sham
Rami Daher
Jordan University of Science and Technology, Amman, Jordan

 

Narrative Borders and the Politics of New History
Alan Mikhail
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Alternative Models to Clustered Cultures: A Discussion of Paradigmatic Themes
Anne Hublin
Ecole d’Architecture, Paris Villemin, France

 

Tropical Tropes: The Politics and Economics of Built Forms in Hot and Humid Climates
Chee Kien Lai
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


B.3 BLURRED BORDERS/POROUS IDENTITIES
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Clara Irazabal
University of Southern California, U.S.A.

 

New Geographies in Northeast China: Regionalism, Patriotism, and Making the “Hong Kong Of The North”
Lisa Hoffman
University of Washington, Tacoma, U.S.A.

 

Border Encounter: A Search for a Translocal Reality in Northern Vietnam
Chan Yuk Wah
Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

 

Borderland Environments, Sites of Regionalization
James Scott
Free University of Berlin, Germany

 

Speaking in Thai, Dreaming in Isan: Popular Thai Television and Emerging Identities of Lao Isan Youth
Catherine Hesse-Swain
Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia


C.3 HYBRID FORMS: TRADITION VS. MODERNITY
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Mike Austin
Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand

 

Exploding Pueblos and Multiplying Hogans: Suburbanization of the First Americans
Jeffrey Cook
Arizona State University, Tempe, U.S.A.

 

The Adoption of the British Cottage Roof Form in the Far East: Accidental Architectural Imperialism?
Lynne DiStefano and Ho Yin Lee
University of Hong Kong, China

 

The Role of the Vernacular in the Making of Tradition
Bashir Kazimee and Ayad Rahmani
Washington State University, Pullman, U.S.A.

 

Making Kuwait: Tradition vs. Modernity
Yasser Mahgoub
Kuwait University, Kuwait


10:35 AM – 10:55 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:55 AM – 12:45 PM—PLENARY SESSION: HYBRIDITY AND THE SPACE OF BORDERS
VERSAILLES
Chairs: Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

David Lung
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Crossing Borders
Margaret Crawford
Harvard University, Cambridge, U.S.A.

 

From Borderlands to Gated Communities: Hybrid Landscapes of Privilege and Prohibition in a not Quite Borderless World
Matthew Sparke
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

Discussant:
C. Greig Crysler
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
BREAK


1:45 PM – 6:00 PM
TOUR OF HONG KONG’S CENTRAL DISTRICT AND OLD VICTORIA
Buses depart in front of the Regal Kowloon Hotel


6:00 PM -8:30 PM
BREAK
Participants will be able to have dinner at their own expense at nearby restaurants before assembling again at the Star Ferry Terminal on the Hong Kong side.


8:30 PM-10.00 PM
STAR FERRY CRUISE OF THE HONG KONG HARBOR
Dessert and soft drinks will be served on board.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2002

8:45 AM – 10:35 AM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.4 DIASPORIC RECONFIGURATIONS
VERSAILLES
Chair: John Webster
University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia

 

Ethnicity, Tradition, and the Design of a British Mosque
Anwarul Islam
Manchester School of Architecture, U.K.

 

Manifestation of Religious Identities in a Mediated Diasporic Space
Reena Mehta
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Private Home as a National Territory: The Role of Public Housing in Making Border Space
Rachel Kallus
Technion, Haifa, Israel

 

Adaptation of Space as Expression of Identity: Muslim Neighborhoods in Britain
Noha Nasser
University of Central England, Perry Barr, U.K.


B.4 CONTESTED BORDERS/CONTESTED SPACES
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Sidney Cheung
Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

 

Regions on the Border of a Nervous Breakdown
Lineu Castello
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

 

Borders, Ethnicity, and Traditions: A Passage to the Northeast of India
Indrani Baruah
Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Ernst May’s Border Settlements, Silesia, 1919-1925
Susan Henderson
Syracuse University, Syracuse, U.S.A.

 

Conflict and Change on the Edge: Border Stories of a Rural Factory in Reform China
Duanfang Lu
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


C.4 THE LIMINAL SPACE OF EAST/WEST DIALOGUE
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Heng Chye Kiang
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

The Chardak: An East-West Dialogue
Judith Bing and Jonathan Brooke Harrington
Drexel University and Temple University, Philadelphia, U.S.A.

 

A City As A Practice Of Social Closure Of Exclusion And Usurpation
Triatno Yudo Harjoko
University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia

 

On Traditional Architecture And Modernization In Betawi Settlements, Jakarta
Yulia Nurliani
University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia

 

Similarities And Dissimilarities In The Turkish And Greek Traditional Houses Of Kula
Cigdem Akkurt
Iowa State University, Ames, U.S.A.


10:35 AM – 10:55 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:55 AM – 12:45 PM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.5 PLACES OF NOSTALGIA AND DISNEYSCAPES
VERSAILLES
Chair: Jeffrey Cody
Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

 

Afghanistan Revisited: Sustainable Development and Eco-Tourism
William Bechhoefer
University of Maryland, College Park, U.S.A.

 

Rewriting Memory: The Impact of Migration on Vernacular Settlements in Greece
Antonia Noussia and Vaso Trova
University of Plymouth, London, U.K. and University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece

 

Matera, Italy: Identity and Tradition Sans Frontieres
Anne Toxey
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Gated Communities and Social Segregation: The Cairene Experience
Basil Kamel
Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt


B.5 CONTESTED EDGES/CONTESTED SPACES
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Marcela Pizzi
Universidade de Chile, Santiago, Chile

 

Divided Cities/Invisible Walls
Paul Simpson
Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow, U.K.

 

Postcolonial Iconization Of Borders
Robert Ian Chaplin
Institute of Tourism Education, Macau

 

Traditions In Conflict And Opportunities For Integration: Housing In Sarajevo, Bosnia
Marina Pecar
Kansas State University, Manhattan, U.S.A.

 

Lhasa’s Barkhor: Contested Space And The (Re)Production Of Tibetan Cultural Identity
William Duncanson
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.


C.5 HYBRID BUILDINGS/HYBRID FORMS
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Mike Martin
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

The Danish Bungalow Unlimited
Helen G. Welling
Copenhagen, Denmark

 

Urban Markets: Sustaining Group Identity And Building New Hybridities
Mary Padua
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Reviving The Betawi Tradition: The Case Of Setu Babakan
Gunawan Tjahjono
University of Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia

 

The Manner Of Manors
Keith Loftin and Jacqueline Victor
University of Colorado and University of Denver, U.S.A.


12:45 AM – 2:15 PM
BREAK
IASTE Advisory Board Meeting


2:15 PM – 4:25 PM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.6 TENSIONS OF PRESERVATION
VERSAILLES
Chair: Magda Saura
Technic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain

 

Remaking Of A Historic, Ethnic City: World Heritage Site In Lijiang As A Contested Space
Jeffrey Hou and Chiao-Yen Yang
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A. and National Taiwan University, Chung-He, Taiwan

 

Origins Of Diaspora: Struggles Over Architectural Identity In A “Famous Hometown Of Overseas Chinese”
Dan Abramson
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

A Silent Contest For The Stepwells Of Western India
Morna Livingston
Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, U.S.A.

 

The Time Dimension: The Impact Of Heritage Listing On Regional Reconfiguration
Chris Landorf
University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

 

An Inquiry Into Attitudes Toward Tradition And Modernity
R. Hanna
Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow, U.K.


B.6 THE LANDSCAPE OF BORDERS
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: Frank Sun
Center for Architectural Research and Education, Hong Kong, China

 

“Beating The Bounds”: Switching Boundaries Over Five Millennia
Paul Oliver
Oxford Brookes University, U.K.

 

South African Provincial Borderlands: Territorial Innovations and “Traditions” Behind Socio-Political Disputes
Benoit Antheaume and Frederic Giraut
Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Johannesburg, South Africa

 

Map Or Mosaic? Cultural Boundaries as Conveyed By Language, Not Drawn With Lines
Rosemary Latter
Oxford Brookes University, U.K.

 

Order Without Equality: The Role of The Border in the Politics of Segregation
Kevin Mitchell
American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.

 

Transformation in the Urban Form of a Traditional City: The Case Of Yazd, Iran
M.R.N. Mohammadi
University of Yazd, Iran


C.6 HYBRID NATIONS/HYBRID PLACES/HYBRID URBANISM
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Robert Mugerauer
niversity of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

The New Territories Market Towns: Intersection of Land and Sea
Patrick Hase
Royal Asiatic Society, Hong Kong, China

 

Latin American Hybrid Spaces and Transcultural Architectures
Felipe Hernandez
University of Nottingham, U.K.

 

Inside/Outside: Shifting Boundaries and Hybrid Places
Susan Rogers
University of North Carolina, Charlotte, U.S.A.

 

Mapping Hong Kong’s Cultural Landscapes: Avoiding an Identity Crisis
Ken Nicolson
Hong Kong, China

 

Myth Of Dominance in the Cultural Representation of the House: An Assessment of Building Codes in Bali
Dewi Jayanti
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2002

8:45 AM – 10:35 AM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.7 HISTORY AND PEDAGOGY
VERSAILLES
Chair: William Bechhoefer
University of Maryland, College Park, U.S.A.

 

Connections and Interactions: Reconfiguring the Architecture Survey Course
Paula Lupkin
Washington University, St. Louis, U.S.A.

 

Toward a Global History of Architecture
Vikram Prakash
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

Architectural Borders: A Case Study in Northern Iran
Frank Brown and G. H. Memarian
University of Manchester, U.K., and University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran

 

Postcards From the Edge of Atlanta’s I-20 East
Michael Gamble
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, U.S.A.


B.7 TEMPORAL BORDERS
LONGCHAMP
Chair: Weijing Wang
University of Hong Kong, China

 

Seeking a New Grand Design for a Reclaimed Region: The Case Study of Nishinasuno Town, Japan
Nobuyoshi Fujimoto and Nobuo Mitsuhashi
Utsunomiya University, Japan

 

Forming, Fading and Reforming: Reconfiguring a Traditional Place in Tainan City, Taiwan
Min-Fu Hsu and Ping-Sheng Wu
National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan

 

It’s About Time! An Investigation of The Unmaking of the Nicosia Green Line
Jamal H. Abed
American University of Beirut, Lebanon

 

Beyond Regional Confines: Traditions Across Borders
Amer Moustafa and Nadia Alhasani
American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.


C.7 NEGOTIATED EGDES/NEGOTIATED HYBRIDITY
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Hesham Abdelfattah
Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

 

Architecture and Industry: Trespassing of Borders and New Architectural Models in Nineteenth-Century Chile
Marcela Pizzi and Maria Paz Valenzuela
Universidade de Chile, Santiago, Chile

 

Privilege at the Edge
Vimalin Rujivacharakul
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Pacific Regionalism: Lines on the Sea
Mike Austin
Unitec, Auckland, New Zealand

 

Material Scarcity and the Vernacular in Micronesia
Jaymes Cloninger
Seoul, South Korea


10:35 AM – 10:50 AM
COFFEE BREAK


10:50 AM – 1:00 PM—PAPER SESSIONS


A.8 IMAGINING SPACE, PLACE, AND REGION
VERSAILLES
Chair: Morna Livingston
Philadelphia University, U.S.A.

 

National Memory And The Aesthetic Construction Of Citizenship: South Africa’s Apartheid Museum
C. Greig Crysler
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

Reconfiguring A Metropolitan Region: Corporate Architectural Typologies In Portland, Oregon
Clara Irazabal
University of Southern California, U.S.A.

 

On The (Re)Authentication Of Israeli Architecture Against The Palestinian Border
Alona Nitzan-Shiftan
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.

 

Space Of Liminality In The Latin AMerican Novel
Maite Villoria
Nottingham University, Nottingham, U.K.

 

What Is This Thing Called Place?
Kazi Ashraf
University of Hawaii, Manoa, U.S.A.


B.8 CONTOURS OF THE NATION-STATE
LONGCHAMPS
Chair: John K.C. Liu
National Taiwan University, Taiwan

 

Circuits Of Power And Powerlessness
Sally Gaule
University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

 

Development And Environmental Risk In Rural China: A Study Of Two Village Enterprise Communities
Bryan Tilt
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

Post-Apartheid Metro Boundaries: Conflicts, Contestations, And Compromises In Durban
Brij Maharaj
University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

 

(Dis)Locating The Merlion In The Artificial Landscape Of Land Reclamation And Shifting Boundaries
Jiat Hwee Chang
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

Cypriot Boundaries
Nadia Charalambous and Nico Peristianis
Intercollege, Nicosia, Cyprus


C.8 RELIGIOUS IDENTITIES AND HYBRID FORMS
LUXEMBOURG I
Chair: Eva Man
Baptist University of Hong Kong, China

 

Reconfiguring The Caribbean: From Fixed Identity To Fluid Hybridity
Robert Mugerauer and Monika Kaup
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.

 

Church, Largo, And Street On Macao
Heng Chye Kiang and Chen Yu
National University of Singapore, Singapore

 

The Flip Side Of The Shrine
Madhuri Desai
University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A.

 

From Haus Tambaran To Church: Continuity And Change In Contemporary Papua New Guinean Design
George Jell and Sabine Jell-Bahlsen
University of Texas, San Antonio, U.S.A.

 

“The Lord Will Provide”: The Role Of Episcopalian Christianity In Nets’aii Gwich’in In Social Development
Steven Dinero
Philadelphia University, U.S.A.


1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
BREAK


2:30 PM– 4:30 PM
FINAL PLENARY PANEL – REFLECTIONS
VERSAILLES
Moderators:
Nezar AlSayyad
University of California, Berkeley, USA

 

David Lung
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

 

Panelists:
Ackbar Abbas
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
 
Margaret Crawford
Harvard University, Cambridge, U.S.A.
 
Neil Leach
University of Bath, Bath, U.K.
 
Matthew Sparke
University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A.


7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
CLOSING RECEPTION
Maman Room, Regal Kowloon Hotel